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Village Fountain

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Getting there: From Tyneham Car Park head towards the Telephone Kiosk. Carry on up Post Office Row and the Village Fountain is straight ahead.

  • The fountain was built in 1853 by Rev. John Bond (1801-1898) who created the Madmore Reservoir at Tyneham from which water to the fountain was piped.
  • Although the fountain supplied the villagers with drinking water, the water is no longer safe to drink.
Tyneham Village Fountain built in 1853
  • The fountain is inscribed with the date 1853 and the following text:

“Whosoever drinketh of this water shall thirst again: but whosoever drinketh of the water that I shall give him shall never thirst; but the water that I shall give him shall be in him a well of water springing up into ever lasting life.”

John 4th 13 & 14

“When I was at school, the village tap was the limit of where we were allowed at play-time, and we queued there, cupping our hands to get a drink.”

Fred Knight
Middlesex cyclist Reg Bicknell taking a refreshment break pre-WW2. Photo courtesy of his grandson Mark Bicknell.

Page last updated: 23 June 2021

Bond Family

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July 2021: Please note this page is currently being expanded


The Bond Family purchased Tyneham including Tyneham House in 1683. The Bonds also acquired Creech Grange (in the neighbouring parish of Steeple) in 1686 and Holme Priory (in the parish of East Holme) in 1690.

Below, the names of Bond family members who owned or lived at Tyneham are followed by the # symbol


Nathaniel Bond (1634-1707) #


Nathaniel purchased Tyneham in 1683 from the Lawrence Family.

Nathaniel was born on 14 June 1634. He was the son of Denis Bond (1588-1658) and his wife Lucy Bond nee Lawrence.1

Nathaniel married Elizabeth Churchill on 21 December 1667. Sadly Elizabeth died in childbirth on 18 December 1674.

Nathaniel married Mary Browne nee Williams on 3 August 1675. Nathaniel and Mary had two sons:

Nathaniel was Member of Parliament for Corfe Castle for one term (1679-1781) and Member of Parliament for Dorchester for two terms (1681-1685 & 1695-1698). He also held the position of the King’s Sergeant-at-Arms.

In 1683 Nathaniel purchased Tyneham from the Lawrence Family. Nathaniel’s second wife Mary was a descendant of the Williams Family that had owned Tyneham before the Lawrence Family. Nathaniel completed his estate acquisitions with the purchase Creech Grange in 1686, which became his main residence, and Holme Priory in 1690.

Nathaniel died on 31 August 1707 and was buried at Steeple.


Denis Bond (1676-1747) #


Denis inherited Tyneham in 1707 on the death of his father Nathaniel Bond (1634-1707)

Denis was born on 10 December 1676. His parents were Nathaniel Bond (1634-1707) and his second wife Mary Bond nee Williams.

Denis married Leonora Sophia Dummer nee Colt on 6 July 1729. She was the widow of lawyer Edward Dummer who had died five years before. Her parents were Sir William Dutton Colt and Mary Colt nee Garneys.

Denis died on 30 January 1747 without male issue. Ownership of Tyneham then passed to his nephew John Bond (1717-1784).


John Bond (1678-1744)


His parents were Nathaniel Bond (1634-1707) and his second wife Mary Bond nee Williams.

John married Margaret Williams and they had the following children:


John Bond (1717-1784) #


John inherited Tyneham in 1746 on the death of his uncle Denis Bond (1676-1747).

John was the son of John Bond (1678-1744) (the younger brother of Denis Bond (1676-1746)) and his wife Margaret Bond nee Williams.

John married Mary Dummer (1717-1787)  at St Paul’s Cathedral, London on 17 July 1749.

John and Mary had the following children:

  • John Bond (1749–1749)died in infancy
  • Leonora Sophia Bond (1749-1750) died in infancy
John Bond and Leonora Sophia Bond baptism
John and Leonora Sophia’s joint baptism on 21 March 1749 at St. George’s, Hanover Square, Westminster – sadly both died in infancy
  • Margaret Sophia Bond (1751-1820) married widower Revd. John Methuen Rogers (1748-1834)
  • John Bond (1753-1824)John of Grange
  • Nathaniel Bond (1754-1823) Nathaniel of East Holme – Member of Parliament for Corfe Castle 1801-1807 – died at East Holme on 8 October 1823, ‘debilitated and reduced to a skeleton’, leaving Holme to his nephew Nathaniel, another younger son.
  • Thomas Bond (1756-1833) # – Thomas of Egliston and Wool Bridge
  • Revd. William Bond (1757-1852) # – William of Tyneham
  • Mary Bond (1760-1842)married Captain Nicholas Caeser Corsellis R.N. (1763 -1833) at Bath Abbey on 10 August 1796 – Nicholas had eleven illegitimate children by his mistress, Sarah Plampin of Essex.
Capt. Nicholas Caesar Corsellis R.N.

John was particularly skilled in the writings of the best Greek and Roman authors. He had studied the constitution of his own country, which he thoroughly understood. He contributed greatly to the peace and happiness of the people in his neighbourhood, as from the general esteem in which he was held he was usually applied to as arbiter in their differences … Many of his leisure hours were spent in improving and embellishing his estate.


Revd. Denis Bond (1719-1795) #


Denis was Rector of Tyneham and Steeple from 1742 until his death in 1795.

the son of John Bond (1678-1744) arm Wadham College Oxford matriculated 29 March 1737 aged 18 BA 1740 MA 1743 of Tyneham & Egliston in the isle of Purbeck.

In 1789 Denis was living at South Egliston while Charles Richards was living in the Rectory.2


John Bond (1753-1824)


John inherited Creech Grange in 1784 on the death of his father John.

John was Member of Parliament for Corfe Castle from 1780 until February 1801.

John married Elizabeth Lloyd (1765-1846) at St. Luke’s Church, Old Street, Finsbury, London on 20 August 1798.

Marriage of John Bond M.P. to Elizabeth Lloyd 20 August 1798

John and Elizabeth had the following children:

  • John Bond (1802-1844)John Bond of Grange – Member of Parliament for Corfe Castle 1823 & 1825 – High Sheriff of County of Dorset 1830 – did not marry – died without issue
  • Nathaniel Bond (1804-1889)
  • Leonora Sophia Bond (1806-1836)

Thomas Bond (1756-1833) #


Thomas looked after the Tyneham estate on behalf of his brother.


Revd. William Bond (1757-1852) #


William inherited Tyneham in 1784 on the death of his father John Bond (1717-1784).

William was born 1757. He was the son of John Bond (1717-1784) and

son of John of Steeple Dorset arm Wadham College Oxford matriculated 24 Oct 1775 aged 18; BA 1779; MA 1783; Rector of Steeple with Tyneham 1795; canon residentary of Bristol

William married Jane Biggs at Stockton, Wiltshire on 28 April 1794.

William and Jane had eight children, two of whom died in infancy:

  • Mary Bond (1789-1872)died as an infant
  • Mary Bond (1798-1872)died as an infant
  • William Bond (1799-1846)called to the Bar in 1824 and in 1842 became Metropolitan Magistrate at Westminster Police Court – did not marry
William Bond  (1799-1846) Metropolitan Magistrate

William built the South Transept at Tyneham Church for the exclusive use of the Bond family leaving the North Transept for the congregation. The seats became known as ‘the Cowstalls’.


Revd. John Bond (1801-1898)


John

John never married.

“For over fifty years the living of Weston was held by a fine old English gentleman named John Bond, a member of an old Dorsetshire family whose home was at Tyneham on the coast. He went to Weston as a very young man, actually nominated while in deacon’s orders, about the year 1827 and retired to Tyneham about 1880, justly loved and honoured by the parish to which he had devoted his life.”

“I should like before passing on to say that I visited the old Vicar, John Bond, aged 92, several times at Tyneham, where he lived with his younger brother, Thomas Bond, aged 88. They were a fine pair of old gentlemen and I loved to go there and hear the reminiscences of the parish, which were surprisingly bright in a nonagenarian memory. After a few more years he passed away and the handsome Churchyard Cross, designed by Mr. Buckle, is his memorial at Weston. It is made of Ham stone and has not worn too well, so looks almost like an ancient cross. I had some little difficulty in persuading the parish to agree to this form of memorial; it was even suggested by some that a public convenience would be of more practical utility! However, I got them keen about the cross when I told them it was a memorial to the unrecorded dead, and a beautiful monument for all parishioners who could not afford gravestones, etc. ”

Archbishop E H Hardcastle

John built the Village Fountain at Tyneham in 1853. He also created the Madmore Reservoir at Tyneham from which water to the fountain was piped.

In 1862 John built the new north porch at Tyneham House.


Revd. Henry Bond (1804-1875) #


Henry inherited Tyneham in 1852 on the death of his father Revd. Henry Bond (1804-1875)

Henry was born

Henry was Vicar of South Petherton, Somerset

Henry married Dublin-born Editha Augusta Mary Pomeroy (1829–1899) in

Henry and Editha had three children:

Henry died at South Petherton on 27 September 1875.


Revd. Nathaniel Bond (1804-1889)


Reverend Nathaniel Bond (1804-1889) & family by William Beetham

Nathaniel, the second son of John Bond (1753-1824) and Elizabeth Bond nee Lloyd , inherited Creech Grange in 1852 on the death of his elder brother John had died in 1844.

Nathaniel married Mary Hawkesworth (1815-1881). Nathaniel and Mary had six children:

  • Leonora Sophia Bond (1837-1862) married John Ramsay (1831-1895)
  • John Bond (1838-1849)died at age 11
  • Nathaniel Bond (1840-1910) married Selina Jane Scott (1843-1891) daughter of John 2nd Earl of Eldon
  • Dennis William Bond (1842-1863)
  • George Hawkesworth Bond (1845-1891)Member of Parliament for East Dorset (1886-1891) – did not marry – buried at East Holme
  • John Lloyd Bond (1856-1857)

Nathaniel built Tyneham School in 1860.


Nathaniel Bond (1840-1910)


Nathaniel married Selina Jane Scott (1843-1891), daughter of John 2nd Earl of Eldon, and had twelve children, one of whom died in infancy:

  • John Wentworth Garneys Bond (1865-1948)
  • Louisa Charlotte Bond (1866-1963)did not marry
  • Denis Raynard De Kenton Bond (1868-1868)died in infancy
  • Gerald Denis Bond (1869-1925)
  • Leonora Sophia Bond (1871-1956) did not marry
  • Rachel Adela Bond (1872-1950)married Captain Paul Warner Bush R.N. on 18 September 1900 and had three sons
  • Revd. Raymond Alured Bond (1873-1941) married Mildred Glyn on 4 October 1899 and had two children
  • Claude Nathaniel Bond (1874-1942)
  • Kenneth Duncombe Bond (1875-1968)married actress Jessie Bateman (1877-1940) in 1939
  • Nigel De Mundeville Bond (1877-1945)married Dorothy Ella Hambro (1876-1953)
  • Herbert Ivo de Kenton ‘Ivo’ Bond (1879-1953)married Lilian Mary Garneys Bond (1887-1890) of Tyneham
  • Walter de Grey Bond (1882-1956)married Margaret Farquharson (1886-1968)

William Henry Bond (1852-1935) #


William inherited Tyneham in 1875 on the death of his father Revd. Henry Bond (1801-1875).

William was born at South Petherton, Somerset on 27 May 1852 and baptised there on 15 July 1852. His father Revd. Henry Bond (1804-1875) was Vicar there from 1832 or before until his death in 1875.

William married Mary Caroline Meysey Thompson (1851–1949) at St Marylebone on 2 July 1878. William and Mary lived at Fryern Court, Burgate near Fordingbridge. They had two sons and three daughters:

  • Algernon Arthur Garneys Bond (1879-1911)‘Algy’ was born on 21 June 1879 – he was severely wounded at the Seige of Ladysmith in the South African War – he died on 13 June 1911 at the Military Hospital, Calcutta, India3
  • William Ralph Garneys Bond (1880-1952)see below
  • Edith Cicely Garneys Bond (1884-1979)married Lewys Legge Yeatman (1879-1962) at Tyneham on 6 September 1910 and had five children
  • Lilian Mary Garneys Bond (1887-1980)married Herbert Ivo de Kenton Bond (1879-1953), known as ‘Ivo’, on 18 January 1914 – he was the son of Nathaniel Bond and Selina Jane Bond nee Scott – Lilian wrote “Tyneham – A Lost Heritage” in 1956
  • Margaret Helen Garneys Bond (1892-1988)known as Margot

William died on 11 January 1935 and was buried at Tyneham. In 1937 his widow Mary visited Norway with daughter Margaret. Mary died on 1 January 1949 after the evacuation and so was unable to be buried with her husband. She was laid to rest at Dorchester.


William Ralph Garneys Bond (1880-1952) #


Ralph inherited Tyneham on the death of his father William Henry Bond (1852-1935)

Known as Ralph, he was educated at Eton and New College, Oxford. He served in the Sudan political service from 1905 to 1926 and was governor of Fung (1922-24) and of Dongola (1924-26). He was a Justice of the Peace for Dorset, having qualified at the 1927 Midsummer Quarter Sessions, and was a member of the Wareham and Purbeck Rural Council. He was High Sheriff of Dorset in 1945.

Ralph married Evelyn Isabel Bond nee Blake (1884-1954). Evelyn was the person who pinned the note on to the church door in 1943 saying ‘’Please treat the church and houses with care. We have given up our homes where many of us lived for generations to help win the war to keep men free. We shall return one day and thank you for treating the village kindly’.

After the evacuation, Ralph and Evelyn moved to Moigne Combe House, built by Henry Pomeroy Bond in 1900.

Ralph and Evelyn had two children:

  • Henry Mark Garneys Bond (1922-2017)see below
  • Elizabeth Mary Garneys Bond (1921-2010)married Sir David Philip Williams (1909-1970), Third Baronet of Bridehead and had three children – Elizabeth was High Sheriff of Dorset in 1979 – in later years she lived at The Stable House, Moigne Combe

Henry Mark Garneys Bond (1922-2017)


Mark inherited Tyneham in 1952.

He served in Royal Green Jackets and became Major-General and Brigadier. He was High Sheriff of Dorset in 1977. He lived at Moigne Combe House until his death in 2017.


Page last updated: 8 July 2021


Bond Family

Home|Families|A-E|F-J|K-O|P-T|U-Z July 2021: Please note this page is currently being expanded The Bond Family purchased Tyneham including Tyneham House in 1683. The Bonds also acquired Creech Grange (in the neighbouring parish of Steeple) in 1686 and Holme Priory (in the parish of East Holme) in 1690. Below, the names of… Continue reading

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Probate – B

Home|Probate|A|B|C|D|E|F|G|H|I|J|K|L|M|N|O|P|Q|R|S|T|U|V|W|X|Y|Z B Beatrice Bessie BALSON died 20 January 1946 – see Beatrice Bessie WALLBRIDGE Herbert John BALSON died 4 May 1962 BALSON Herbert John of 57 Green Road Poole died 4 May 1962. Administration Winchester 15 August (1962) to Gertrude Ellen Balson widow. Effects £280 10s. Susan Priscilla BALSON died… Continue reading

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Gravestone Images & Inscriptions – B

Images of gravestones are arranged in alphabetical order of surname Bascombe In Memory ofE. M. B. who died July 2nd 1827aged 18 months Note: The mason appears to have carved 18 months in error. Elizabeth was aged just 8 months when she died. IN LOVING MEMORY OFJAMESTHE BELOVED HUSBAND OFBESSIE ELIZA… Continue reading

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2008: History wakes up

By Nick Churchill BENEATH the muck and dust of ages, Tyneham’s centuries-old farm is stirring. For nearly 65 years all that has moved through its stables and stalls are bats, creepy-crawlies and the odd range warden – but a new project is under way that will see these buildings restored… Continue reading

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1945: Dorset’s new Sheriff

Mr. William Ralph Garneys Bond, of Tyneham House, Corfe Castle, Dorset’s new sheriff, was born in 1880, was educated at Eton and New College, Oxford. He served in the Sudan political service from 1905 to 1926 and was governor of Fung (1922-24) and of Dongola (1924-26). He is a Justice… Continue reading

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1910: Forthcoming Marriages

Mr. L.L. Yeatman-Biggs and Miss Cicely Bond The marriage of Mr. Lewin Legge Yeatman-Biggs, son on the Bishop of Worcester and the late Lady Barbara Yeatman-Biggs, to Miss Cicely Bond, daughter of Mr. William H. Bond, of Tyneham House, Wareham, Dorset will take place on September 6 at Tyneham Church.… Continue reading

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1893: The Royal Wedding

THE ROYAL WEDDING. – A tea for the people of Tyneham was given at Warbarrow by the Rev. J. Bond, of Tyneham House, to celebrate the wedding of the Duke of York. At the same time and place Mr. N. Bond, of Grange, gave a tea to the children of… Continue reading

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  1. Dorset History Centre, D-53/1 Title A private chronology of Denis Bond, Esq. of Lutton in the Isle of Purbeck year 1634 “My Sonne Nathaniell born 14 June []
  2. Land Tax Assessment 29 June 1787 []
  3. Probate Calendar 1912 []

Tyneham Rectory

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Please be aware the ruined shell of Tyneham Rectory has now been fenced off for safety reasons but can be viewed from a short distance.


Tyneham Rectory


Brief history

  • Tyneham Rectory was built in 1853 by the Rector Revd. Nathaniel Bond to the west of Tyneham Church.

  • For the first 32 years of its life, the Rectory was home to the Curate Revd. William Truell – the Rector lived over at Creech Grange

  • Tyneham Rectory was an impressive building with a large barn, enclosed cobbled courtyard, formal garden, greenhouse and a tennis court.

  • In 1891, the Rectory was home to eleven members of the Wordsworth family and four servants

  • Originally the Rectory had a curving driveway but this was later converted to a substantial rectangular gravelled parking area.

  • The Rectory was exposed to the elements especially when a line of trees blocking its views were removed.

  • In 1966 it suffered major fire damage

  • Today it is just a single-storey shell cordoned off from public access.


The Rectory over the years …

The new parson’s house begun in April 1853 at Tyneham to the west of the church, about a gun shot from the church.

Henry Rolls, Shoemaker & Diarist, East Lulworth

Tyneham Rectory with curving driveway
The Rectory with curving driveway

My husband’s grandfather, Nathaniel Bond of Grange, who built the rectory on succeeding to the property, was patron of the living and its holder too. During his long incumbency his brother-in-law, the Reverend William Truell, served as his curate and was resident at Tyneham. The parson’s wife and the curate’s were twin Hawkesworth sisters. Another assistant priest was housed at Steeple in the later years of “Uncle Nat’s” long life.

Lilian Bond

The following advertisement gives a flavour of the contents of the Rectory in 1889 when the late Revd. William Truell’s daughter Eleanor was looking to move with her elderly widowed mother Jane to Wimborne Minster.

Sales of the Truell family's household furniture at Tyneham House in 1889
Western Gazette, 13 September 1889

Tyneham Rectory in 1926 with Evelyn De Labilliere
Evelyn De Labilliere with daughter Ruth and Nell the retriever

The rectory roof was built with too shallow a pitch, giving rise to perpetual trouble. The rain poured into the house after storms and hundreds of pounds were spent on repairs with no lasting improvement.

Lilian Bond

Tyneham Rectory in 1930 with Revd. Sharpe's car outside
Rev. Sharpe’s car is parked outside

‘It is a square house, very large for the village, with a tennis court, and looks as if it must have been very jolly in peacetime.

2nd Lt David Greville-Heygate, attached to the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment

In 1966, the Rectory suffered major fire damage.

Tyneham Rectory in 1973

When Tyneham was reopened to the public, many buildings were made safe by removing roof structures and reducing the height of remaining walls where necessary. The Rectory was reduced to a single storey.

Tyneham Rectory in 2012

More recently, the remaining structure has become unsafe and has now been cordoned off from public access.


Location

What Three Words location = locked.action.comforted

List of Rectors


1936 – Tyneham Rectory Roof / Garden Fete

TYNEHAM RECTORY ROOF – URGENT NEED OF REPAIR – GARDEN FETE WITH TWO-FOLD OBJECT The raising of funds towards meeting the cost of urgently-necessary repairs to the roof of the Rectory, the residence of the Rev. and Mrs. G. Clifford Frend, was the primary object of a fete held on… Continue reading

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Page last updated: 25 July 2021

Timeline

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Below is a Timeline providing information on events at Tyneham over the centuries. It shows when ownership of Tyneham changed hands, when Tyneham House, Tyneham Church and Tyneham Rectory were built. It includes tragic events that claimed the lives of men from Tyneham and Worbarrow.

Year Mth/Day Event
BRONZE AGE
c3000BC Burial mounds are built on Povington Heath
IRON AGE
c400BC Flower’s Barrow hill fort is built on the cliff top above Worbarrow Bay
13TH CENTURY
1297 The original Tyneham Church is built
16TH CENTURY
1563-1583 Elizabethan main section of Tyneham House is built for Henry Williams
17TH CENTURY
1641 34 men of Tyneham swear the Protestation Oath
1678 Administration of the goods of Henry Miller
1683 Nathaniel Bond buys Tyneham and Creech Grange
18TH CENTURY
1707 Nathaniel Bond dies – his son Denis Bond inherits Tyneham
1744 Nave roof of Tyneham Church is covered with lead & other alterations made
1746/47 Jan 30 Denis Bond dies – his nephew John Bond inherits Tyneham
1784 May 30 John Bond dies – son Rev. William Bond inherits Tyneham. He builds the South Transept at Tyneham Church for the exclusive use of the Bond family leaving the North Transept for the congregation. The seats become known as ‘the Cowstalls’
1784 The smaller of the two bells at Tyneham Church is recast by R Wells of Aldborne
19TH CENTURY
1831 Reform Riots
1832 South Transept of Tyneham Church is replaced with much larger one
1835 James Galton, 53, agricultural labourer from Worbarrow is convicted of smuggling
1841 Jun 7 1841 Census: total population of parish=250
1851 Mar 30 1851 Census: total population of parish=276
1852 Mar 5 Rev. William Bond dies – son Rev. Henry Bond inherits Tyneham
1853 Village Tap built
1860 Tyneham School is built
1861 Apr 7 1861 Census: total population of parish=272
1865 Mar 4 Five coastguard men from the Coastguard Station at Worbarrow drown
1871 Apr 2 1871 Census: total population of parish=269
1872 A harmonium replaces the barrell organ at Tyneham Church
1874 May 21 Three coastguard men from the Coastguard Station at Worbarrow drown
1875 Sep 27 Rev. Henry Bond dies at South Petherton – W.H. Bond inherits Tyneham
1876 Tyneham Rectory is built
1880 South porch at Tyneham Church is removed and rebuilt as west porch
1881 Apr 3 1881 Census: total population of parish=275
1882 Alfred Dawson sketches Tyneham House
1883 Dec 25 The Great Western Railway’s paddle steamer South of Ireland hits the rocks off Worbarrow Bay in fog and is holed. Fortunately all lives are saved.
1886 Jun 19 Three coastguard men from the Coastguard Station at Worbarrow drown
1891 Apr 5 1891 Census: total population of parish=260
1898 Rev. John Bond dies
1899 Dec 10 Tyneham heir Algernon Bond is severely injured in a sortie during ‘The Siege of Ladysmith’ in the Boer War
20TH CENTURY
1901 Mar 31 1901 Census: total population of parish=238
1902 Mr & Mrs W.H. Bond present Tyneham Church with a new pipe organ as a thank-offering for the recovery of their son “Algy” (Algernon)
1910 The Coastguard Station at Worbarrow is disbanded
1910 Sheepleaze Cottage is built on the cliffs at Worbarrow
1910 An oak tree is planted to commemorate the coronation of King George V
1911 Apr 2 1911 Census: total population of parish=209
1911 Jun 13 Algernon Bond dies of malaria in Calcutta, India
1914-1918 THE GREAT WAR
1915 Aug 21 Private Bertie Taylor is killed in action aged 21
1915 Dec 8 Private Henry (“Harry”) Holland is killed in action aged 27
1916 Feb 26 Private William Meech is killed in action aged 28
1916 Nov 13 Private John Holland is killed in action aged 21
1917 The Ministry of Defence acquires land at Lulworth and commences live firing
1917 Oct 20 Private Henry George Balson is killed in action aged 38
1917 Nov 2 Private Charles Job Cleall is killed in action aged 27
1921 1921 Census: total population of parish=196
1923 Jun 16 William Mintern,15 and his cousin Ernest Percy Rose, 23 drowned in Worbarrow Bay
1924 Oct The new Wooden Village Hall is formally opened
1929 Dec Wooden Village Hall is destroyed in gales
1929 The public telephone box is installed in Post Office Row
1931 1931 Census: total population of parish=165
1932 Mar 24 Tyneham School closes because of the ‘small number of pupils’
1935 W.H. Bond dies – son Ralph Bond inherits Tyneham
1937 Aug 10 Schoolboy Roderick Maurice Fitzgerald ffrench-Mullen aged 13 killed after being thrown from horse at Worbarrow
1939-1945 WORLD WAR 2
1940 Ralph Bond forms the Tyneham Home Guard
1940 Jul 11 Messerschmitt Me110 crash-landed on Povington Heath. The two-man German crew became the first prisoners of the ‘Battle of Britain’
1941 Radar Station is built on a ridge above Egliston Gwyle
1941 The RAF requisitions Tyneham House as an administration centre for the radar station at Brandy Bay
1943 Nov 16 The parishioners are served with Notice of Eviction from Major General C H Miller of Southern Command
1943 Dec 19 The Military take-over: All residents are evacuated
1944 Feb 25 Able-Seaman Charlton Holland is killed when a German U-Boat sinks HMS Mahratta
1944 Dec 29 Allied convoy TBC 21 is attacked by German U-boat U-772 in the English Channel, 50°28´N, 02°28´W. The freighter Black Hawk is torpedoed and the blast wounds four (one of whom died later). The survivors were taken on board HMS Dahlia and the ship abandoned. The stern
1947 Dec Government publishes White Paper ‘Needs of the armed forces for land for training and other purposes’
1948 Mar Sir Cecil Oakes chairs Public Inquiry at Masonic Hall in Wareham
1952 Compulsory Purchase Order made on Tyneham House
1956 Lilian Bond publishes “Tyneham A Lost Heritage
1966 Fire destroys Tyneham Rectory
1967 Dec Rodney Legg publishes the first issue of Dorset County Magazine which kick-started the ‘Surrender Purbeck’ campaign
1968 May 18 Tyneham Action Group is formed with Philip Draper as chairman and Rodney Legg as honorary secretary
1969 May 22 Deputation from Tyneham Action Group received by M.O.D. in London
1969 Tyneham Action Group publishes “Fight for Tyneham
1970 Prime Minister Edward Heath announces Lord Nugent is to chair a Defence Lands Committee to explore which parts of the M.O.D estates could be returned to private ownership
1971 May 21 Rodney Legg, ‘founder and instigator’ of the Tyneham Action Group, condemns its ‘ill-conceived’ policies
1972 Rodney Legg forms rival organisation with the name ‘The 1943 Committee’ – it publishes its ‘Blueprint for Tyneham’
1972 Aug 28 The 1943 Committee attends a Protest Rally in Tyneham car park
1973 Jul 5 Lord Nugent publishes Defence Lands Committee Report
1973 Jul 5 Rodney Legg establishes ‘Friends of Tyneham
1974 The Government provides £10,000 to create a car park and safe paths
1975 Sep 5 Lulworth Range Walks formally opened by Colonel Sir Joseph Weld
1977 Mar 30 Scheme to appropriate the redundant Tyneham Church as a rest and exhibition centre confirmed
1979 First service held at Tyneham Church in 36 years
1992 Rodney Legg publishes “Tyneham Dorset’s Ghost Village
1995 Patrick Wright publishes “The Village That Died For England
21ST CENTURY
2000 Millennium Oak Tree planted in churchyard
2003 Dec 21 60th Anniversary Carol Service held at Tyneham Church . Former residents invited to see completed refurbishment of church including exhibition boards
2007 Dr. Andrew Norman publishes “Tyneham: A Tribute
2007 Nov: The Army launches its Tyneham Farm project
2008 Tyneham Farm renovated and re-opened to the public
2009 R J Saville publishes ‘Tyneham in Purbeck
2012 The K1 Mark 236 Telephone Kiosk is renovated
2012 Nov 11 Service of Remembrance held at Tyneham Church
2014 Robert Westwood publishes ‘The Tyneham Story
2016 Gordon Lewis publishes ‘Tyneham with Worbarrow: Then & Now


Page last updated: 4 July 2021

Tyneham Cottages

Home|Tyneham Buildings|The Row|Tyneham Church|Tyneham Farm|Tyneham Rectory|Tyneham School|Tyneham Cottages|Village Fountain


The ruins of most Tyneham cottages can be viewed from a short distance. They are fenced off for safety reasons but storyboards are on display. Only those in The Row can be entered.

Sadly the ruins of Museum Cottage are off limits


Page last updated: 27 June 2021

The Row

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MUST SEE: The Row is a former row of terraced houses now reduced to their shells. It is safe to wander in and out of the cottages.

The Row at Tyneham Dorset including the former post office and telephone kiosk
The Row in August 2017. Photo courtesy of Sara Mills.

Each house now contains a storyboard providing more information about who lived there in the past complete with photographs. For detailed information, click on each property in the list below.

The Row was a row of four terraced houses, numbered from the higher end nearest Tyneham Church. The properties were originally thatched, but were later tiled c. 1880.

Map and satellite view showing the location of The Row and Post Office at Tyneham
The Row at Tyneham circa 1900 with hedges before the stone wall was built
The Row c.1900 with hedges
The Row at Tyneham circa 1910 when walls had been built
The Row c. 1910 with walls
The Row c. 1935 with telephone box
The Row c. 1935

Page last updated: 22 June 2021

Tyneham Farm

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Gate to Tyneham Farm
Photo by grassrootsgroundswell

MUST SEE: Some of the Tyneham Farm outbuildings have been restored and now house a variety of farm implements. Check out the Tyneham Barn stage, the Scrappy Wall and the garden.

Getting there: From Tyneham Car Park head south on the unmade road that leads through the trees towards the toilets. Turn left and Tyneham Farm is a very short distance beyond the toilets.

Please note the exhibitions in Tyneham Church, Tyneham Farm and Tyneham School open at 10am and close at 4pm.

Things to look out for:

  • Storyboard on way into farm
  • Scrappy wall
  • Tyneham Barn
  • Cottage Garden

Known farmers of Tyneham Farm include:

  • 1902-1940: Walter Case Smith (1861-1948) see the Smith family page
  • 1940-1943: Sydney George Churchill (1900-1975)see the Churchill family page

My uncle’s farm was about 500 acres and carried a flock of Dorset Horn sheep. In addition, there was a large herd of dairy cows and a large area of cereals. The evening’s milk would be collected at 8 a.m. the following morning. There was no laid on water, electricity or sewerage system. In summer the large churns were placed in water overnight. It always amused me to see the lorry driver duck his head into each churn to test the freshness.

Hugh Hutchings

Uncle Walter certainly had no tractors when he left in about 1940. When a new tenant arrived, (Mr. Churchill) much consternation was caused by his introducing tractors and sacking some of the men.

Hugh Hutchings

The Farmhouse

Please be aware that Tyneham Farmhouse is no longer standing.

“The dairyman’s house and farmhouse formed one block of building with a common roof, excellent dwellings both.

Lilian Bond

The Dairyman’s House

The top floor of the dairy house was all one airy room whose well-scrubbed boards were covered by rows of big blue vinny cheeses, in different stages of the ripening process.

A colonnaded lean-to on the north side of the dairy-house accommodated the great cheese press, and the vats connected with the cheese-making, a process carried out by ‘dairy chap’ and wife in spotless pinners.”

Lilian Bond

Milking Parlour

The Milking Parlour is still standing, but it’s use is somewhat different now – it now houses the public toilets!

Cow Stalls and Piggeries

The cow stalls and piggeries are no longer standing.

The Granary

The granary still stands but the interior is closed to the public.

The building dates from the early 1800s. It was altered in 1904 as part of extensive improvements to the farm by landowner William Bond. The exterior maintains many of its original features. Inside the floorboards upstairs rotted many years ago

The Great Barn

The barn had wide access doors on the east side, opening on to the stable yard, and also the west side, opening on to the cow yard.

The Cart Sheds

The Cart Sheds were at the southern end of the Stable Yard. Part of the sheds is still standing but the roof tiles have been replaced with metal roofing sheets.

The Cottage Garden

Access to the Cottage Garden is through the archway at the west side of the Great Barn.

The Scrappy Wall

Click here to read more about the Scrappy Wall.

The Tyneham Farm Project

Page last updated: 21 May 2021


2008: History wakes up

By Nick Churchill BENEATH the muck and dust of ages, Tyneham’s centuries-old farm is stirring. For nearly 65 years all that has moved through its stables and stalls are bats, creepy-crawlies and the odd range warden – but a new project is under way that will see these buildings restored… Continue reading

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Tyneham Church

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MUST SEE: Tyneham Church has been restored and now includes an exhibition of village life.

Telling the story of the everyday lives of the villagers during the first half of the last century, the church exhibition serves as a memorial to their sacrifice. Their family names are displayed in the frieze of tiles around the church and their photographs look down from the oak panelled walls.

Getting there: From Tyneham Car Park head towards the Telephone Kiosk. Carry on up Post Office Row and Tyneham Church is straight ahead.

Please note the exhibitions in Tyneham Church, Tyneham Farm and Tyneham School open at 10am and close at 4pm.


Things to look out for at St Mary’s Church, Tyneham: 

  • Notice on Church Door

During the Second World War it became necessary for the British Army to extend its existing training area. The inhabitants of the Tyneham Valley were evacuated. When they left they pinned a note to the church door.

It read:

Please treat the church and houses with care. We have given up our homes, where many of us have lived for generations, to help win the war to keep men free.

We will return one day and thank you for treating the village kindly.

The Bible

  • Exhibition boards

One of many boards telling Tyneham’s story

  • Tiled Surnames

One of many surnames displayed on the walls

  • World War One Memorial Tablet

Click here for more information on those named

  • Stained Glass Windows

  • Tyneham Churchyard

What Three Words location for main entrance door = Mixing Cake Shifting


Brief history of Tyneham Church

  • Parts of Tyneham Church date from circa 1190.
  • In 1744 the church was altered considerably and the nave roof was covered with lead.
  • In 1832 the present South Transept was built replacing the much smaller original.
  • In 1880 the 14th Century South Porch was taken down and used to build a new West Porch.
  • In 1943 a note was pinned to the door ‘Please treat the church and houses with care’.
  • Today Tyneham Church includes an exhibition of village life.
  • Although the church has been de-consecrated it still belongs to the Diocese of Salisbury. The Ministry of Defence pays them £1 a year as rent.
  • Tyneham Church finally became a Grade II Listed Building on 17 December 2020, together with Tyneham School and the Village Fountain


Rectors

Many rectors have served at Tyneham but the service of two in particular stand out:

  • Revd. Denis Bond was Rector for 53 years from 1742 to 1795
  • Revd. William Bond (1757-1852) was Rector for 57 years from 1795 to 1852

Click here for full list of Rectors


Page last updated: 3 July 2021

Tyneham School

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Tyneham School

MUST SEE: Tyneham School closed in 1932 but the building has been faithfully restored and reburbished to recreate an authentic 1920’s classroom.

GETTING THERE: From Tyneham Car Park walk towards the Telephone Kiosk. Carry on up Post Office Row and then turn left. Tyneham School is on the left.

Please note the exhibitions in Tyneham Church, Tyneham Farm and Tyneham School open at 10am and close at 4pm.

Wat Three Words location for entrance door = Sobs Taller Enabling (switch to satellite view)


Things to look out for:

  • Children’s named school pegs in entrance lobby
  • Children’s work on desks

Please be aware the children’s work has been created to give an authentic feel. It is not the actual work of the children named. The same is true of the children’s pegs.


Brief history

  • The Tyneham National Elementary School was built in 1856, originally to house 60 children.
  • Numbers remained low throughout the 1920s.
  • Sadly attendance fell to just nine children and in 1932 the school was closed ‘for reason of economy’. The children were then taken by bus to Corfe Castle school.
  • The old school building was then used as a village hall. By December 1943, the property had been requisitioned by the NAAFI (Navy, Army and Air Force Institutes).

The children

The children walked in from the outlying farms and villages. So if the weather was bad, attendance was poor as the teacher’s log book shows. Similarly outbreaks of flu or other diseases kept many children off school. Also children were off when the farms were busy with harvesting and other work such as hedging and ditching.

Children from 4 to 14 were taught in the same room. The younger ones used the stage behind the drawn curtain, counting beads on strings or drawing with blunt crayons, usually under the eye of a ‘pupil teacher’. Children as young as three would often wander in to join their brothers and sisters.


The teachers

  • 1861 Mrs Louisa Knapp & Mrs Sarah Ann Hinde
  • 1871 Miss Hester Legg & Miss Elizabeth Crumpler
  • 1881 Miss Hester Legg & Miss Sarah Hood
  • 1895-1907 Mrs Ann Elizabeth Fry nee Newberry (1857-1910)

Mrs Fry … suffered from arthritis and was very lame but kept her charges in good order nevertheless.

Lilian Bond

  • 1907-1921 Miss Norah Sophia Woodman (1871-1944)
  • 1921-1928 Mrs Malvina Pritchard nee Harper (1874-1964)
  • 1928-1932 Miss Leonora Maria Hearne (1880-1977)

There was a very strict regime under Mrs. Pritchard, head teacher from 1921 to 1928. Even her son, Arthur, who attended the school was shown no favouritism. The late Kathy Barnes of East Stoke, (then Kathy Wrixon) recalled there was no talking and knuckles were rapped if the pen was held incorrectly for handwriting. Joined-up writing was practised from the start, with careful attention to spacing of letters. The Union Jack was saluted on entering school.

The late Winnie Applin (then Winnie Bright) was a pupil teacher trained by Mrs. Pritchard for four years. Winnie walked from Kimmeridge every day and knew all the best places to find orchids on the way. Apparently she caused a stir when she got a motorbike and rode it to school! Winnie was particularly valued by Mrs. Pritchard as she was the only one who could play the piano.


Shows

When the school put on an evening show, the unwieldy bench desks were taken outside and the villagers would bring their own chairs. Children sat on the floor or perched on the bookcases at the back watching the show by the light of paraffin lamps.

Page last updated: 23 June 2021


1906: Tyneham School

SCHOOL CHALLENGE SHIELD. – This school has won the challenge shield for the East Dorset Division this year. DR. BARNARDO’S HOMES. – A collection box has been made by the school children in aid of Dr. Barnardo’s Homes with the following results: – Irene Knight, 13s 7d; Lizzie Restreux, 11s… Continue reading

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