Gravestone Images & Inscriptions – E

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Everett


EVERETT:
Kitty EVERETT nee PARK (1842-1920)

Photo copyright of Martin White

IN
LOVING MEMORY OF
KITTY
BELOVED WIFE OF
GEORGE EVERETT
DIED JAN 31 1920
IN HER 78TH YEAR
PEACE PERFECT PEACE
?

For more information see Everett family page


EVERETT:
Thomas William Samuel Manbridge Everett (1904-1986)

Dorothy ‘Violet’ Jane Everett nee Davis (1915-1991)
Photo copyright of Martin White

AT HOME
IN MEMORY OF
THOMAS W. S. M. EVERETT
1904-1986
DOROTHY V. J. EVERETT
NEE DAVIS
1915-1991
MUCH LOVED PARENTS
REST IN PEACE

For more information see Everett family page


Page last updated: 7 June 2020

Everett

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Members of the Everett family lived at Tyneham from 1890 or before and up to the evacuation in 1943


George Everett (1848-1928)

George was born at Broadwinsor, Dorset in 1848 to labourer Thomas Everett (1820-1890) and his wife Maria Everett nee Lane (1815-1887). George was baptised at St John the Baptist, Broadwinsor on 1 October 1848.

On Christmas Day 1870 George, then a labourer, married Kitty Park (1842-1920) at Buckland Ripers, Dorset. George signed the register with his mark.

Kitty was born at Corscombe, Dorset to labourer James Park and his wife Sarah Park nee Frampton. Kitty was baptised at Corscombe on 1 May 1842.

By 1871 George and Kitty were living at Coryates near Portesham, Dorset. George was an ‘ag lab’ and Kitty’s occupation was given as ‘field lab’.

George and Kitty had four children together:

  • Samuel James Everett (1871-1937) – married Louisa Haysom
  • Virtue Mary Park Everett (1877-1964) who married Tom Henry Mansbridge Gould (1872-1948) – see Gould family
  • Thomas William Everett (1879-1890) – born at Warmwell – died in a tragic accident in a stone pit at Tyneham
  • George William Everett (1882-1957) – see below

Kitty also had a son from a previous relationship:

  • John George Buckler Park (1864-1949) – after leaving Tyneham John moved to London where he married Eliza Augusta Park (1868-1927) and had five children – John was a railway porter in 1911

George and Kitty moved to South Egliston, Tyneham from Warmwell with  five children by 1890. Sadly their son Thomas died in a tragic accident at Tyneham that year.

In June 1899, there was a Quoit Match at Egliston. Brothers Samuel and George were on the home team against Tyneham but suffered a humiliating 7 games to one defeat.

By 1911, George and Kitty had moved to Steeple. Their son George, then aged 29, was living with them along with a lodger, Frank Gould, aged 34.

In the 1911 census schedule Kitty was shown as having a total of 7 children from her marriage to George, 4 of whom had died. More investigation is needed.

Kitty died at Steeple in February 1920 aged 78. She was buried at Tyneham. See Gravestones page.

Widower George returned to Tyneham and died there in May 1928. He was buried in Tyneham Churchyard om 8 May 1928..


George William Everett (1882-1957)

George was born at Bincombe, Dorset on 13 May 1882 and was baptised on 23 July 1882.

By 1890 the family were living at Tyneham.

. – married Lily Jane Hawkins – George and Lily had a son Archibald James Everett (1912-1970) known as Archie.

George was employed at Tyneham Farm by Walter Case Smith. When Walter’s second wife died in 1938, George and Lily were mourners at her funeral.

In 1975, range wardens uncovered villagers’ WW2 ration books in an old corrugated iron shed at the back of Tyneham Post Office – among them were Lily’s and son Archie’s.

WW2 ration books of Lily Everett and son Archie were found at Tyneham in 1975

Archibald James Everett (1912-1970)

Archie was born on 21 August 1912. He was nicknamed ‘Whippet’.

In 1932 Archie, aged 20, was fined 30 shillings.

Archie married Hilda Wheeler in 1944.

Photo courtesy of Mark White

Page last updated: 10 February 2021


Gravestone Images & Inscriptions – E

Everett INLOVING MEMORY OFKITTYBELOVED WIFE OFGEORGE EVERETTDIED JAN 31 1920IN HER 78TH YEARPEACE PERFECT PEACE? For more information see Everett family page AT HOMEIN MEMORY OFTHOMAS W. S. M. EVERETT1904-1986DOROTHY V. J. EVERETTNEE DAVIS1915-1991MUCH LOVED PARENTSREST IN PEACE For more information see Everett family page Page last updated: 7 June… Continue reading

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Everett

Home|Families|A-E|F-J|K-O|P-T|U-Z Members of the Everett family lived at Tyneham from 1890 or before and up to the evacuation in 1943 George Everett (1848-1928) George was born at Broadwinsor, Dorset in 1848 to labourer Thomas Everett (1820-1890) and his wife Maria Everett nee Lane (1815-1887). George was baptised at St John… Continue reading

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Gould

Home|Families|A-E|F-J|K-O|P-T|U-Z The Gould Family lived at Tyneham from Thomas Henry Mansbridge Gould (1872-1948): Tom was the Head Gardener. Tom married Virtue Mary Park Everett (1877-1964) at Tyneham on 20 April 1904. Virtue was the sister of George Everett and aunt of Archie Everett. Tom and Virtue had: John Cedric James Gould… Continue reading

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1975: Tyneham’s ration of nostalgia

HISTORY stopped at Tyneham 32 years ago. Just before Christmas,1943, the villagers gave up their homes to make way for an army firing range, and the village died. The villagers of Tyneham never went back. Their bitter and protracted struggle for possession of their homes ended in failure as the… Continue reading

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Gould

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The Gould Family lived at Tyneham from


Thomas Henry Mansbridge Gould (1872-1948):

Tom was the Head Gardener. Tom married Virtue Mary Park Everett (1877-1964) at Tyneham on 20 April 1904. Virtue was the sister of George Everett and aunt of Archie Everett.

Tom and Virtue had:

  • John Cedric James Gould (1912-2010) – John

At the time of the evacuation, most of Virtue’s crockery was smashed while being transported in an old tin bath.


John Gould’s letter to Prime Minister Harold Wilson

19 December 1974

Dear Prime Minister,

I was born on 24 October 1912 in the Gardener’s Cottage at Tyneham on the Dorset coast. I lived and worked in the village until 1940 when I joined the Army.

Then in 1944, when I was fighting with the Devonshire Regiment in India, I had a letter from my mother saying they had been evicted from their home on 19 December 1943, which is 31 years ago today.

Our home was taken over by Major C.H. Miller of Southern command who gave written and verbal promises that we could return ‘at the end of the emergency’. This pledge was made at Cabinet level by Winston Churchill. The eviction notice stated: ‘The Government appreciate that this is no small sacrifice which you are asked to make, but they are sure you will give this further help towards winning the war with a good heart.

In 1948 the Government accepted that we had a right to return home but said that priority had to be given to national defence needs. Then in 1961, Mr Silkin legally closed 92 miles of public paths in and around Tyneham. We no longer have any right to see our old homes again.

You can imagine my tremendous pleasure and excitement when Lord Nugent’s report in 1973 said these tank ranges should be returned to the people of Dorset. I had always wanted to return, and at last it seemed this was going to happen.

Tyneham to me is the most beautiful place in the world and I want to give the rest of my life and energy to its restoration…

As a life-long member of the Labour Party, I appeal to you to look again at Tyneham’s plight before there is a Parliamentary debate on this matter.

If you reject this plea, I must make a second request, that when my time comes I will be interred in Tyneham Churchyard. It is there – and in memory of many old friends, my Grandparents and Uncle Tom, who were allowed to live out their lives in Tyneham – that I would like this wreath to go. Most of all, I want to go home.

John Gould


Page last updated: 27 June 2021

1975: Tyneham’s ration of nostalgia

HISTORY stopped at Tyneham 32 years ago. Just before Christmas,1943, the villagers gave up their homes to make way for an army firing range, and the village died.

The villagers of Tyneham never went back. Their bitter and protracted struggle for possession of their homes ended in failure as the Army retained control over a hamlet of tumbledown cottages.

Now, as Army range wardens are working to clear up the remains of the village, has come a reminder of those early war years.

Ration books for everyone living in the village before they were dispossessed have been found by the wardens, in an old corrugated iron shed at the back of Tyneham post office.

Ration books found at Tyneham

Names like Everett, Longman, Colin Driscoll, the postmaster, and William Holland, who lived at Baltington Cottage, are still clearly legible on the tattered and crumbling orange and buff coloured pieces of paper.

And the injunction from the Ministry of Food to write your surname and National Registration Number on the counterfoil before handing it to the retailer is clearly visible, too.

Coupons for sugar, bacon and ham, meat and cooking fats are crossed off in blue pencil, for these bits of paper are the remains of used-up ration books, thrown into a pile by postmaster Colin Driscoll some time in 1943.

And there, it seems, they stayed for 32 years.

“We found them as we were demolishing the old shed at the back of the post office,” said warden Mrs. Jane Cato. “They were under a pile of ash on the floor, with rat holes all around. I’m afraid they all break up very easily,” she added.

Mrs. Cato, the only woman warden on the army range, took the ration books home to her cottage in Lulworth, and is now cleaning them up.

“We hope eventually to put them on show, wrapped in polythene, at Tyneham Church,” she told the Echo.

The church, deconsecrated some years ago, is planned by the Army as a museum and an information centre for the public who use the Army range walks when the soldiers aren’t firing.

The books will take pride of place in the museum, particularly as little else of value has been discovered in the village by the wardens.

“There was surprisingly little of value in the village – most of the villagers must have taken everything they had with them when they left,” said Mrs. Cato.

From a dump near the stream they found a few bottles and old inkwells, from the greenhouse of Tyneham House they took a water pump in perfect working order, and from a farmhouse they took a pair of Victorian scales.

But they found little else to stock a museum of old Tyneham.

So those who knew Tyneham in pre-war years will have to rely on the names in old ration books to spark off memories of life in the village.

Memories like those of Miss Margaret Taylor, whose name appears in faded ink on one of the ration books. Miss Taylor, who lives with her sister in Corfe Castle, is a frequent visitor to the tiny 13th century church, which is maintained by the Department of the Environment at the edge of the village.

“We showed her round the old post office and she was amazed to see the huge tree growing just in front of the building,” said Mrs. Cato. “She remembered giving it to the postmaster as a six-inch pot plant about 40 years ago!”

Published by Bournemouth Evening Echo, Tuesday 16 December 1975