Video Clips

Home


Tyneham Video Clips You Tube

Check out some of our favourite links to You Tube videos about Tyneham & Worbarrow. Take a look around the village today and hear what former residents have to say.


Lauren Learns History (2021) | 10:27

Narrated by Lauren Grierson. Produced by Lauren Learns History.


Death of a Village (2007) | 9:18

Featuring interviews with former resident Douglas Churchill, campaigner Rodney Legg and range warden Paul Fancy.

Narrated by Jane MacFarland. Produced by Chris Taviner with Matt Hatchard.


Remembering Tyneham (2008) | 4:37

Featuring interviews with author Dr. Andrew Norman and former resident Arthur Grant.

Filmed, produced & directed by Cein McGillicuddy.


Tyneham Ghost Village (2007) | 9:11

Featuring photographs of the Davis and Holland families and many of the village. No narration. Onscreen titles.

Film made by Mark White.


Tyneham Village (2011) | 6:10

Footage of most of Tyneham village buildings including aerial stills. No narration. On screen titles.

Film made by Shaun Matthews of Low Level Aerial Photography.


Tyneham the lost village (2011) | 7:22

A brief tour of the village buildings including Tyneham Church, Tyneham School and Tyneham Farm narrated by Peter Marsh.

Film made by Peter Marsh from Reading Film & Video Makers Club 2011


Tyneham Memories (2013) | 14:57

Major General Mark Bond is interviewed by Vince Jones, producer of ‘Tyneham: The Musical’

Published by ‘Tyneham: The Musical’.


Tyneham Village (2013) | 4:41

Footage of The Row, Tyneham School, Rectory Cottages, Tyneham Church & Rectory. No narration.

Film by Axell Photo Studios.


The Last Harvest – Henry Buckton (2017) | 4:53

Song about Tyneham village, Dorset

Song by Henry Buckton with images taken from this website


Tyneham Village (2017) | 3:57

Narrated overview with footage of buildings.

Film by Mark at Silverlight.


Tyneham Village (2018) | 4:42

Aerial footage of Tyneham Rectory, Gould’s Cottage and Tyneham Church. No narration.

Film made by EagleVista Aerial Imaging.


Page last updated: 25 June 2021

Grant family

Home|Families|A-E|F-J|K-O|P-T|U-Z


The Grant Family lived at Gwyle Cottages in Tyneham from 1924 to 1942. The family left Tyneham a year before the evacuation.


Henry George ‘Harry’ Grant (1898–1977)


Harry was born on 8 December 1898 at East Stoke, Dorset. He was the eldest son of John William Grant (1873-1944) and his wife Annie Grant nee Hood (1864-1926). His father was a woodman by trade but by 1901 was also the sub-postmaster at East Stoke. The post office in those days was on the main Wareham to Wool road opposite the lane to Rushton crossing.

Harry married Beatrice Marjorie ‘Marjorie’ Smith (1901–1982). Marjorie was born on 15 May 1901 at Throop, Hampshire.

The Grant family: Harry and Marjorie

Harry and Marjorie had one son, Arthur John Henry Grant (1922-2010) – see below.

Harry and Marjorie were both ‘in service’ at Tyneham House from around 1924.

My parents moved to Tyneham when Dad got the job as estate woodman for the Bond family. We had John Gould’s house – he moved to Gardener’s Cottage as he had been promoted to head gardener at Tyneham House.

Arthur Grant, 2000

In 1939 Harry’s occupation was given as Woodman. Marjorie was performing ‘unpaid domestic duties’. Living with them at Gwyle Cottages was Cyril Frank Griffiths (1928-1998)see later.

Mum took in children from the east end of London during the war. They had never seen the sea or had a holiday. One lady, now aged 76, wrote to me last year to say she still remembered Tyneham and wondered what I had done since then. I sent her some newspaper cuttings, I even found a photo of her sitting on the doorstep of our cottage.

Arthur Grant, 2006

The family left Tyneham in 1942, a year before the evacuation. They later lived at Coombe Heath.

Harry died in 1977 and Majorie died in 1982.


Arthur Henry John Grant (1922-2010)


Arthur was born on 20 April 1922.

The Grant family: Athur Grant

An enterprising boy, was young Arthur. He discovered that a good way of making extra pocket money was to volunteer to open and close gates for the increasing number of motorists who began to come from far afield to visit Worbarrow Bay. There were four gates and a penny or two was thrown from the cars as a reward. On a good day a boy might take home as much as three or four shillings.

Helen Taylor, 1994

Arthur left school at 13 and was taken on as Pantry Boy and then Under Footman at nearby Tyneham House where his parents were in service. In 1937 he left Tyneham, aged 15, to join the Merchant Navy. Arthur did not learn that the village had been evacuated until he returned home after his ship was bombed off the coast of Ireland.

Arthur later was a steward on the flying boats and for Qantas and was even part of the crew which flew the Queen to Australia in 1954.

After leaving the merchant navy he became a professional photographer.

Arthur married his wartime sweetheart Dorothy Grace ‘Grace’ Rawles (1926–2015) in 1953. They settled in Wareham and had a daughter Annette and a son Geoffrey.

Arthur retired in 1990. Arthur died at home on 12 January 2010 aged 87 after a long illness. His ashes are buried in Tyneham Churchyard. Grace died on 13 August 2015 aged 88 years.


Cyril Frank Griffiths (1928-1998)


Cyril was the adopted son of Harry and Marjorie.

cyril frank griffiths

Cyril and I played a lot mostly in the duck pond where the Gwyle re-merges from under the road. In 1939 after the war started, we made battleships out of offcuts of wood, using old nails as the 16inch guns.

Colin Driscoll, 2002

If you have any memories or photos of the Grant family that you wish to share, please email us. Our address is shown on the home page.


Page last updated: 2 May 2020

Video Clips

Home Check out some of our favourite links to You Tube videos about Tyneham & Worbarrow. Take a look around the village today and hear what former residents have to say. Lauren Learns History (2021) | 10:27 Narrated by Lauren Grierson. Produced by Lauren Learns History. Death of a Village… Continue reading

Tagged | Comments Off on Video Clips

Grant family

Home|Families|A-E|F-J|K-O|P-T|U-Z The Grant Family lived at Gwyle Cottages in Tyneham from 1924 to 1942. The family left Tyneham a year before the evacuation. Henry George ‘Harry’ Grant (1898–1977) Harry was born on 8 December 1898 at East Stoke, Dorset. He was the eldest son of John William Grant (1873-1944) and… Continue reading

Tagged , , , | Comments Off on Grant family

2015: Death of Dorothy ‘Grace’ Grant

DOROTHY ‘GRACE’ GRANT Passed away peacefully at home after a short illness on Thursday 13th August aged 88 years. Beloved wife of the late Arthur (photographer). Much loved mum of Geoff and Annette and to Tanya and Mike. Dear grandma of Jamie-Lee, Saffron and Poppy and to Andrew, ‘G-Mar’ of… Continue reading

Posted in , | Tagged | Leave a comment

2010: Lingering ghosts of a long-dead England

Tyneham in Dorset was already a museum piece when it was shut down during the Second World War. It never reopened by David Randall There’ll be another burial in the village next week. Arthur Grant’s ashes will be interred in the churchyard at Tyneham in Dorset. He left more than… Continue reading

Posted in , | Tagged | Leave a comment

2010: Death of Arthur Grant

GRANT ARTHUR (AMENDED NOTICE) (Photographer) aged 87 years peacefully at home on Tuesday 12th January 2010. Dearly beloved Husband of Grace and Dad of Geoff, Annette and to Tanya and Mike. A dear Grandad of Jamie-Lee, Saffron and Poppy. Funeral Service in the Church of Lady St Mary, Wareham, Monday… Continue reading

Posted in , | Tagged | Leave a comment

2010: Tributes paid to legendary Purbeck photographer Arthur Grant

by Jim Durkin The family of legendary Purbeck photographer Arthur Grant have paid a heartfelt tribute to a “huge character who will always be remembered with affection and love”. Arthur passed away peacefully at home last Tuesday at the age of 87, after a brave battle against a protracted illness.… Continue reading

Posted in , | Tagged | Leave a comment

2015: Death of Dorothy ‘Grace’ Grant

DOROTHY ‘GRACE’ GRANT Passed away peacefully at home after a short illness on Thursday 13th August aged 88 years. Beloved wife of the late Arthur (photographer). Much loved mum of Geoff and Annette and to Tanya and Mike. Dear grandma of Jamie-Lee, Saffron and Poppy and to Andrew, ‘G-Mar’ of Gracie-May and Harlie-Arthur. Funeral Service in the Church of St Martin on the Walls, Wareham on Friday 21st August at 2.00pm. Family flowers only please, donations if desired for Marie Curie, Wareham Health Centre and The Tyneham Fund may be sent to Albert Marsh Funeral Directors, St Michaels Road, Wareham, Dorset, BH20 4QU.

Published in the Dorset Echo, 15 August 2015

[Dorothy Grace Grant nee Rawles (1926-2015)]

2010: Lingering ghosts of a long-dead England

Tyneham in Dorset was already a museum piece when it was shut down during the Second World War. It never reopened

by David Randall

There’ll be another burial in the village next week. Arthur Grant’s ashes will be interred in the churchyard at Tyneham in Dorset. He left more than 60 years ago, but now the last of him will return to the village that laid down its life for the Second World War.

In 1943, the army needed Tyneham to expand its Lulworth firing range, and so everyone was shipped out. Ever since, the only way of becoming a resident again is to die and be buried here. Arthur is believed to be the last of them. Now there is no one with any memory of this curious place which did not wither or change but simply shut its doors and went away.
Even for the time, Tyneham was a period piece, albeit an ambiguous one. For romantics, it was, in its old ways, a keepsake of a once-unchanging England. For modernists, it was, with its broken roadways, its single telephone, and the Bond family owning all the land, an affront to progress.

But, to a few hundred people, it was home. In the early decades of the 20th century, there was Mrs Manktelow, the widow at Double Cottages, the schoolmistress Mrs Pritchard, old Charlie Miller, the Knights, including Fred and his father, coachman to the Bonds at Tyneham House; Charlie Meech, the odd-job man up at the big house; and Mrs Taylor, the village wise woman.

There were two villages here, really. Down the Gwyle, the coombe that led to the sea, was Worbarrow. Then there was Tyneham proper, with its fields of sheep and its Elizabethan manor house. Closer to the green was St Mary’s church; the rectory, home to parsons grand enough to make use of the tennis courts; Dorset stone homes; the one-roomed school; and The Row, the line of terraced cottages punctuated by the village’s only shop.

By the late 1930s, there were cracks in its chocolate-box façade. The school had closed in 1932. There was no pub; Worbarrow’s coastguard station had closed; there was no electricity, no piped water and no development – unless the Bonds sanctioned it.

Then came the war. A radar station was set up on Tyneham Cap, and, to staff it, the Women’s Auxiliary Air Force arrived. They requisitioned Tyneham House, and airmen were billeted in homes. In November 1943, every villager received a letter. “It is necessary,” it began, “to move you from your homes.” By 19 December, all 225 were gone. Many were under the impression they would return, but in 1947 they were told there would be no coming back. Compensation was paid in 1952 and periodic campaigns were mounted to wrest back the village.

They failed, but concessions were made. In 1975, burials were allowed, and the army’s guns are muzzled on 134 days a year so ramblers and curious civilians can once again come to Tyneham. The manor house was demolished in 1967, and thatched roofs have fallen. But the church is preserved, and the school is a museum. In it are the clothes pegs of pupils, and one bears the name Arthur Grant. His ashes will be in the churchyard, but the memory of him, and some of the spirit of the place he once inhabited, lives on.
Published by, and copyright of, The Independent, Sunday 24 January 2010

2010: Death of Arthur Grant

GRANT ARTHUR (AMENDED NOTICE) (Photographer) aged 87 years peacefully at home on Tuesday 12th January 2010. Dearly beloved Husband of Grace and Dad of Geoff, Annette and to Tanya and Mike. A dear Grandad of Jamie-Lee, Saffron and Poppy. Funeral Service in the Church of Lady St Mary, Wareham, Monday 25th January at 2.15pm. Family flowers only please, donations if desired for Wareham Surgery Medical Trust Fund and the Tyneham Fund may be sent to:- Albert Marsh Funeral Directors, St Michaels Road, Wareham, BH20 4QU. Tel. 01929 552107.

Published by Bournemouth Echo, Tuesday 19 January 2010

[Arthur Henry John Grant (1922-2010)]

 

2010: Tributes paid to legendary Purbeck photographer Arthur Grant

by Jim Durkin

The family of legendary Purbeck photographer Arthur Grant have paid a heartfelt tribute to a “huge character who will always be remembered with affection and love”.

Arthur passed away peacefully at home last Tuesday at the age of 87, after a brave battle against a protracted illness. He worked as a professional photographer for three decades, with many of his pictures featuring in the Daily Echo and Swanage and Wareham Advertiser.

Son Geoffrey said: “Dad will be remembered fondly, having touched many people’s lives in his role as the photographer in Wareham and Purbeck.”

Arthur is also remembered as one of the last inhabitants of Tyneham village, which was requisitioned by the army and used as a practice area for the historic D-Day landings. The village, heavily damaged, would eventually be substantially restored and opened to the public. Arthur went on to give many interviews for books and television about his schoolboy memories of Tyneham life. In a moving gesture, his family have been given special permission for his ashes to be interred at Tyneham – Arthur is finally going home.

The year before the outbreak of the Second World War, Arthur, aged just 16, joined the Union Castle Shipping Line. He served as captain’s steward on the Capetown Castle, which was converted into a troop carrier and survived a bombing off Northern Ireland. During leave he met young Dorset woman Dorothy Grace Rawles, his beloved Grace, who he went onto marry at Poole in 1953. He is survived by Grace and their two children, Geoffrey and Annette. Arthur also worked as a steward on the flying boats which operated out of Poole and for Australian airline Qantas, where he rose to the rank of deputy flight steward controller. He was honoured to be selected as part of the crew flying the Queen to Australia during her 1954 tour.

After returning to England, to help his sick mother in the late 1950s, Arthur and Grace settled in Mill Lane, Wareham. It was around this time he decided to turn his love of photography into a profession. After retirement in 1990 Arthur became a prolific gardener.

His funeral service will be held at the Church of Lady St Mary, Wareham, on Monday at 2.15pm. The family will be holding light refreshments at the South Street Conservative Club afterwards.

Published by, and copyright of, the Daily Echo, 19 January 2010